Courses Offered by CSDL Faculty

CSDL classes being offered in Spring 2007:

  • CPSC 470/670: Information Storage and Retrieval
  • CPSC 489/689: Creative Systems
  • CPSC 610: Hypertext
  • CPSC 667: Collaborative Systems and Models
  • CPSC 671: Computer-Human Interaction

CSDL classes tentatively planned to be offered in Fall 2007 include:

  • CPSC 444: Structures of Interactive Information
  • CPSC 634: Intelligent User Interfaces
  • CPSC 655: Human Centered Systems and Information
  • CPSC 672: Computer-Supported Collaborative Work

CSDL classes tentatively planned to be offered in Spring 2008 include:

  • CPSC 436: Computer-Human Interaction
  • CPSC 656: Computers and New Media
  • CPSC 675: Digital Libraries
  • CPSC 689: Physical Interfaces

Undergraduate

  • Computer-Human Interaction - CPSC 436

    This course is designed to cover comprehensively the area of Computer-Human Interaction (CHI). Course content will include the history and importance of CHI, theories of CHI design, modelling of computer users and interfaces, empirical techniques for task analysis and interface design, styles of interaction and future directions of CHI including hypermedia and collaborative systems. Prerequisites: CPSC 320 and CPSC 321 or consent of instructor.

    Offered yearly. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2007.

  • Structure of Interactive Information - CPSC 444

    An ecosystems approach to the programming, design, authoring, and theory of hypermedia. Object-oriented visual and interactive programming. Visual design, including color, space, text and layering. The reference as a metadisciplinary structure. Collecting and sampling. Ontologies, maps, and navigation as means of structuring information. Students create interactive information that is expressive and interpretive.

    Taught yearly. Next offered in Fall 2007.

  • Information Storage & Retrieval - CPSC 470

    Information Storage and Retrieval (IR) covers issues of representation, storage, and access to very large multimedia document collections. This course covers the fundamental data structures and algorithms of state-of-the-art information storage and retrieval systems and relates the various techniques to the design and evaluation of complete retrieval systems delivered on the Web and in Digital Libraries.

    You will learn the algorithms behind Internet search engines such as Altavista and Yahoo! Coverage not only includes large text collections, such as traditional book and journal libraries, but also still, audio and video image collections. Digital libraries will be explained and students will have the opportunity to use a state-of-the-art digital library system for building interesting collections of multimedia objects.

    Taught yearly. Next offered in Spring 2007.

  • Computers and New Media - CPSC 489 (see also linked graduate class)

    This class investigates potential and realized impact of computers in the design of media. Examples of questions to be considered are: (1) How does storytelling change when the reader can take links? (2) What about when the "reader" plays the role of a character in the story? and more generally: (3) What characteristics of computational media are appropriate for what types of communication and stories? Thus, some of the topics we will cover include (1) effect of computers on reading and belief of information, (2) computer's impact on the author, reader, and the interaction between them, (3) computers and argumentation, and (4) interactive genres of literature. These topics will be discussed at both a conceptual and tool level. By the end of the course, you will be able to look at an existing system or design a new system with an understanding of the impact it may have on communication and storytelling. Prerequisites: Students should have a basic knowledge of computing and the humanities, and the ability to program complex systems and be able to learn new software tools on their own.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2008.

  • Groupware - CPSC 489

    Groupware products such as instant messengers, multiplayer computer games, networked virtual environments, and desktop conferencing tools are increasingly penetrating our everyday lives in recent years. This undergraduate course introduces students to an emerging area that is full of research and development opportunities. Students learn the basic principles for developing and evaluating groupware applications. Course work in computer-human interaction and distributed systems will help but is not prerequisite.

    New course; to be scheduled.

  • Creative Systems - CPSC 489/689

    New course. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2007.

Graduate

  • Hypertext/Hypermedia Systems - CPSC 610

    Comprehensive coverage of Hypertext/Hypermedia; basic concepts and definitions; fundamental components, architectures and models; problems and current solutions; design and implementation issues; and research issues. Prerequisites: CPSC 310 and 410.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2007.

  • Intelligent User Interfaces - CPSC 634

    Intersection of artificial intelligence and computer-human interaction: emphasis on designing and evaluating systems that learn about and adapt to their users, tasks, and environments. Prerequisites: Graduate classification and approval of instructor.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Fall 2007.

  • Human Centered Systems and Information - CPSC 655

    A foundation course in human centered systems and information. Understanding and conceptualizing interaction. Design and prototyping methodologies. Evaluation frameworks. Visual design using color, space, layering, and media. Information structuring and visualization. Individual and team programming projects.

    Taught yearly. Next scheduled to be taught in Fall 2007.

  • Computers and New Media - CPSC 656 (see also linked undergraduate class)

    This class investigates potential and realized impact of computers in the design of media. Examples of questions to be considered are: (1) How does storytelling change when the reader can take links? (2) What about when the "reader" plays the role of a character in the story? and more generally: (3) What characteristics of computational media are appropriate for what types of communication and stories? Thus, some of the topics we will cover include (1) effect of computers on reading and belief of information, (2) computer's impact on the author, reader, and the interaction between them, (3) computers and argumentation, and (4) interactive genres of literature. These topics will be discussed at both a conceptual and tool level. By the end of the course, you will be able to look at an existing system or design a new system with an understanding of the impact it may have on communication and storytelling. Prerequisites: Students should have a basic knowledge of computing and the humanities, and the
    ability to program complex systems and be able to learn new software tools on their own.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2008.

  • Collaborative Systems and Models - CPSC 667

    Collaborative systems support group activities over computer networks. With the emphasis on human factors, system design is fundamentally different from traditional systems. This course overviews existing research efforts to address various design issues. The students will be informed of the state-of-the-art knowledge in this area and learn how to implement collaborative applications.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2007.

  • Information Storage and Retrieval - CPSC 670

    Information retrieval deals with the representation, storage, and access to very large multimedia document collections. This course covers the fundamental data structures, algorithms, and access methods of current information storage and retrieval systems and relates the various techniques to the design and evaluation of complete retrieval systems. Course content includes coverage of algorithms for indexing, compressing, and querying very large digital collections and tools and techniques for managing information services on the Internet. PREREQUISITES: CPSC 310 or approval of instructor and good working knowledge of Unix, C, and a scripting language (such as Perl); graduate classification.

    Taught yearly. Next offered in Spring 2007.

  • Computer-Human Interaction - CPSC 671

    This course is designed to comprehensively cover the area of Computer-Human Interaction (CHI). Course content will include the history and importance of CHI, theories of CHI design, modelling of computer users and interfaces, empirical techniques for task analysis and interface design, styles of interaction and future directions of CHI. Emphasis will be on previous, current, and future research in CHI. Prerequisite: Graduate classification.

    Taught yearly. Next scheduled in Spring 2007.

  • Computer Supported Collaborative Work - CPSC 672

    Covers design, implementation and use of technical systems that support people working cooperatively; draws from the research area of Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) and includes current theoretical, practical, technical and social issues in CSCW and future directions of the field. Prerequisite: CPSC 671 or 610 or approval of instructor.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Fall 2007.

  • Digital Libraries - CPSC 675

    The course surveys current research and practice in Digital Libraries, which seek to provide intellectual access to large-scale, distributed, digital information repositories. The course will be based on current readings taken from the research literature and will cover the breadth of this highly interdisciplinary area of study. Prerequisite: Graduate classification in computer science.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2008.

  • User Interfaces for Information Visualization - CPSC 689

    Covers information visualization techniques with emphasis on application to user interface design. Focus on interactive representations to present static and dynamic information spaces, potentially including transformation of the
    display substrate's viewing characteristics. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in CPSC or permission of instructor.

    Not currently scheduled.

  • Recombinant Media Ecosystems - CPSC 689

    An investigation into processes of collecting and combining digital media samples. The analysis and production of work created via sampling, remix, detournement, collage, and montage, e.g., Dada and Surrealist collage, Cage's Silence, Stockhausen's music concrete, Eisenstein's montage, postmodern tv commercials, hip hop, and installation art.

    The interface as ecosystem. Expressive interfaces. Models of creativity. Techniques and aesthetics of audio and video editing. Composition and visualization. Tools for media recombination. Procedural methods. Generative agents. Roles for surrogates and metadata. Interactivity: feedback and mappings.

    Students will design expressive interface ecosystems of media recombination, with procedural mechanisms. The course will be reflective and research project-oriented, with an emphasis on creating meaningful experience.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2009.

  • Physical Interfaces - CPSC 689

    The development of physical interfaces that integrate computers with human environments. The acquisition and processing of physical signals for multimodal human computer interaction. The design of physical and social spaces that respond to human expression. The development of distributed sensor networks for
    responsive environments and wearable computers. Embodied interactivity and cognition. The application of body-based performance practices and cultural theories. Mappings from sensory signals to visualization and sonification.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2008.

  • Digital Humanities - CPSC 689

    Digital Humanities incorporates the application of Computer Science techniques in the context of the Humanities and Humanities-based approaches in the context of Computer Science. The course covers basic concepts and definitions, fundamental underpinnings, exemplary projects, application areas, standards,
    research issues, and the relationship between traditional and digital forms.

    Taught in alternate years. Next scheduled to be taught in Spring 2009.